How to Avoid Learner Fatigue by Creating Positive Learner Experiences and Learning Experiences

To prevent what occurred in so many organizations suffering the “Zoom fatigue” brought on by an endless stream of video meetings, L&D must take a more thoughtful, holistic approach to creating and delivering learning for a hybrid workforce. It starts with recognizing learning’s place in the overall employee experience and ensuring it is enhancing that experience rather than detracting from it.

Driving Learner Engagement in the Hybrid Workplace

L&D must establish itself as a guiding light in unfamiliar waters. This is critical as organizations see an increased demand for upskilling and reskilling to improve internal talent mobility — especially since just more than one-third of companies believe they are prepared to develop the skills they will need in the future. Business is moving too fast and the workforce is too busy, distracted and now geographically dispersed for traditional training models to be completely effective.

How to Meet Modern Learners’ Needs in the Hybrid Workplace

One outcome of the pandemic has been the complete transformation of the workforce. A huge shift to remote work followed by an inconsistent and uncertain return has fundamentally changed the look and dynamics of the workforce. Companies must now mange a flexible, variable, hybrid workforce at a time when upskilling and reskilling these employees has become critical.

Injecting Learning into the Organization’s Cultural DNA

In the process of reexamining their approach to learning and development, companies have been looking at their strategies, technologies, and processes to uncover ways to better develop the workforce and close skills gaps. What really needs to happen, though, is for the organizations themselves to make a shift, developing and sustaining a culture of continuous learning.

Demonstrating Learning’s Value to the Business

A Brandon Hall Group Smartchoice Platinum Preferred Solution Provider, EI Design, has developed a model that includes many elements from existing models to give companies a granular framework for successful measurement. It is designed not only to help companies determine the learning’s impact on business outcomes but also help identify the “learnability” of their programs. In other words, companies can discern how quickly and proficiently learners attain information, knowledge or skills — both initially and over time.